Know all about blood clots and Pulmonary Embolism

In the information driven world, we are constantly searching for ways to update ourselves in various tops relating to health, wellbeing and nutrition. The web is an excellent platform where most people educate themselves on all matters pertaining to health especially. Doctors give inadequate information and thus it is best to keep one self-informed about such conditions, especially the pulmonary embolism risk factors. Pulmonary embolism is a serious life-threatening condition that has claimed the lives of millions across the globe.
Health and wellness brings about a drastic improvement in the overall quality of your life. Pulmonary Edema causes are many, and if left untreated, can lead to fatal results. Patients complaining of chest pain and/or shortness of breath should be considered with the treatment, to avoid disabilities and death. The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism may be difficult to make, and is often missed. Prevention is the best treatment for pulmonary embolism, which can be accomplished by minimizing the risk factors for deep vein thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism.
Although anyone can develop blood clots Symptoms leading to pulmonary embolism, certain factors can increase your risk. Prolonged immobility increases your rick to develop the condition. Blood clots are more likely to from in legs during long period of inactivity. People who sit or stand for hours or while traveling on long journeys should take 15 minutes break so as to help in the circulation of blood from the legs to the heart. Age and pregnancy also contributes to the higher risk of developing clots. Smoking, obesity and medicines involving estrogen, also increases the risks for developing PE.
Pulmonary embolus is the end result of a deep vein thrombosis or blood clot in the body. Most commonly, it begins in the leg, but they also can occur in veins within the abdominal cavity or in the arms. To define Pulmonary Embolism, It can be simply said that PE is the blockage in the blood vessels in the lung that causes shortness of breath or chest pain, being the most initial symptoms.
If a PE is treated promptly, the outlook is good, and most people can make a full recovery. After surgery, and post treatment, one must consult with their doctors for ultimate recovery. Exercise can help improve the recovery, where the main objective is to strengthen your lungs and entire body and improve circulation. If you need to know more about treatment, Pulmonary Edema causes, symptoms or risk factors, there are many websites that offer detailed and relevant information to help patients on the depth to recovery and also create awareness. It is important to have an in depth knowledge regarding the condition, as it can it can happen to anyone

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An overview of Deep Vein Thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism

We can define pulmonary embolism as a blockage in either one or more arteries leading to or in the lungs caused due to embolus, or a clot. In almost each case, clot originates in deep vein inside the pelvis, arms, or legs, breaks loose, and then travels to lungs. Depending on the size, blood clot obstructs either a small or large pulmonary artery and then blocks the blood flow through that vessel.

Risk Factors for Deep Vein Thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism

 

A lot of Pulmonary Embolism Risk Factors are there. People having more than a single risk factor simultaneously are at even bigger risk. Immobility (for example, following surgery or an injury) and blood clot disorders (called hypercoagulable or thrombophilia state) are main risk factors. Most common kind of genetic thrombophilia is the factor V Leiden that also increases the risks for pregnancy complication.

Other factors which increase the risks for DVT include:

  • Cancer and its treatment
  • Pregnancy and postpartum period
  • Obesity/overweight
  • Hormone therapy (for example birth control pills)
  • Varicose veins
  • Sitting for long period of time (e.g., on a plane, in the car)

DVT Pulmonary Embolism Symptoms and Signs

Symptoms of DVT differ, depending on the severity and location of blood clot. In almost 50% of the patients who have this condition, DVT tends to be asymptomatic (i.e., doesn’t cause symptoms). In a few cases, the patients aren’t aware that they’ve DVT until blood clot travels onto the lung and then causes pulmonary embolism.

Symptoms of DVT include the following:

  • Pain or tenderness
  • Swelling (edema)
  • Warmth
  • Redness or discoloration

A few patients having DVT experience pain within the calf when their foot is flexed upwards (known as Homan’s sign). But, this sign can be also associated with some other conditions and isn’t present in all the patients with DVT.

 Signs of pulmonary embolism consist of shortness of breath, cough, chest pain, and low fever (approximately 101°F). In a few cases, the patients who have pulmonary embolism do cough up blood (known as hemoptysis). The condition can also cause feelings of apprehension and restlessness, and irregular heart rate (known as arrhythmia).

What is the Pulmonary Edema?

In general, Edema means swelling. This occurs typically when fluid from in blood vessels seep outside the blood vessels into the surrounding tissue, causing swelling. It can happen either due to too much of pressure in blood vessel or not sufficient proteins in bloodstream to hold up to the fluid inside the plasma (the element of the blood which does not contain the blood cell).

Pulmonary edema causes when alveoli gets filled up with surplus fluid seeped out from the blood vessels inside the lung rather than air. It can cause trouble with exchange of gases (carbon dioxide and oxygen), resulting in breathing trouble and poor blood oxygenation. At times, this is referred to as the “water in lungs” whenever describing the conditions to the patients.

Pulmonary edema may be caused by lots of different factors. This can be related with heart failure, known as cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and related to the other causes, called as the non-cardiogenic’s pulmonary edema. To know more Blood Clot Symptoms and it’s treatment visit Pulmonary Emboli.

pulmonaryemboli

An overview of Deep Vein Thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism

We can define pulmonary embolism as a blockage in either one or more arteries leading to or in the lungs caused due to embolus, or a clot. In almost each case, clot originates in deep vein inside the pelvis, arms, or legs, breaks loose, and then travels to lungs. Depending on the size, blood clot obstructs either a small or large pulmonary artery and then blocks the blood flow through that vessel.

Risk Factors for Deep Vein Thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism

A lot of Pulmonary Embolism Risk Factors are there. People having more than a single risk factor simultaneously are at even bigger risk. Immobility (for example, following surgery or an injury) and blood clot disorders (called hypercoagulable or thrombophilia state) are main risk factors. Most common kind of genetic thrombophilia is the factor V Leiden that also increases the risks for pregnancy complication.

Other factors which increase the risks for DVT include:

  • Cancer and its treatment
  • Pregnancy and postpartum period
  • Obesity/overweight
  • Hormone therapy (for example birth control pills)
  • Varicose veins
  • Sitting for long period of time (e.g., on a plane, in the car)
  • DNA

DVT Pulmonary Embolism Symptoms and Signs

Symptoms of DVT differ, depending on the severity and location of blood clot. In almost 50% of the patients who have this condition, DVT tends to be asymptomatic (i.e., doesn’t cause symptoms). In a few cases, the patients aren’t aware that they’ve DVT until blood clot travels onto the lung and then causes pulmonary embolism.

Symptoms of DVT include the following:

  • Pain or tenderness
  • Swelling (edema)
  • Warmth
  • Redness or discoloration

A few patients having DVT experience pain within the calf when their foot is flexed upwards (known as Homan’s sign). But, this sign can be also associated with some other conditions and isn’t present in all the patients with DVT.

Signs of pulmonary embolism consist of shortness of breath, cough, chest pain, and low fever (approximately 101°F). In a few cases, the patients who have pulmonary embolism do cough up blood (known as hemoptysis). The condition can also cause feelings of apprehension and restlessness, and irregular heart rate (known as arrhythmia).

What is the Pulmonary Edema?

In general, Edema means swelling. This occurs typically when fluid from in blood vessels seep outside the blood vessels into the surrounding tissue, causing swelling. It can happen either due to too much of pressure in blood vessel or not sufficient proteins in bloodstream to hold up to the fluid inside the plasma (the element of the blood which does not contain the blood cell).

Pulmonary edema causes when alveoli gets filled up with surplus fluid seeped out from the blood vessels inside the lung rather than air. It can cause trouble with exchange of gases (carbon dioxide and oxygen), resulting in breathing trouble and poor blood oxygenation. At times, this is referred to as the “water in lungs” whenever describing the conditions to the patients.

Pulmonary edema may be caused by lots of different factors. This can be related with heart failure, known as cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and related to the other causes, called as the non-cardiogenic’s pulmonary edema.